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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and immigration one of his other signature pieces and issues 35 percent approval. and federal budget that is carl cameron 32. and economy 38. and these are approval ratings. what is going on here? >> not surprising to be honest with you. once a president gets in the soup, all of the numbers have a way of coming down. combine that with the fact that people are not sure about the iran agreement and everything else, it is not a pretty picture. something happen today that may change the trajectory. >> which is what? >> i was those -- teasing you. >> the third quarter growth up to it 3.6 percent. i don't know if that were to hold but if it holds another quarter that could turn the president's fortunes around. >> that is one. michelle what about this? >> this is the first time since 1974 that majority of americans see this country as not powerful, as powerful as a decade ago. they are less respected and think that their country is not important on the global stage and the reason why is the foreign policy. putting obama care aside which is awful, a lot has to do with foreign policy. we saw what happened
, too, do demands far living wang. and a tactical shift in the ongoing fight for immigration reform. first understanding the impact and importance of president nelson mandela. >> i pledge to use all my strength and ability to live up to expectations. we are going forward. our noorch freedom is irreversible. we must not allow fear to stand in our way. >> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. the world lost one of its greatest leaders and agents of social change with the passing of nelson mandela at the age of 95 on thursday. madiba, the clan name by which he was known, transcended the boundaries of south africa as it became synonymous with the country's greatest struggles and triumphs. mandela meant many things to many people, including president obama, who offered this tribute shortly after mandela's death. >> for now, let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived, a man who took history in his hands and bent the arc of the moral universe towards justice. >> no one can deny the indelible contributions and sacrifices that nelson mandela made and for the people
're going to need strong application of anti-discrimination laws, we need immigration reform that gross the any and takes people out of the shadows. we're going to need targeted initiatives to close those gaps. [ applause ] >> but -- but here is an important point, the decade's long shifts in the economy have hurt all groups, poor and middle class inner city and rural folks, men and women, and americans of all races, and as a consequence some of the social patterns that contribute to declining mobility, that were once attributed to the urban poor, that's a particular problem for the inner city. single parent households or you know drug abuse or -- it turns out now we're seeing that pop up everywhere. a new study shows that disparities in education, mental health, obesity, absent fathers, isolation from church, isolation from community groups, these gaps are now as much about growing up rich or poor as they are about anything else. the gap in test scores between poor kids and wealthy kids is now at nearly twice what it is between white kids and black kids. kids with working class parents
with immigration. the same thing that we're going to have to do for voting rights. i just -- he referenced so much work, gave us a road map to do it. >> schieffer: we'll have to leave it there. thank you all so much. >> thank you. >> schieffer: really something. thank you all. we'll be back in a moment. >> i am a yankee! [ male announcer ] celebrate the season -- it's customer appreciation month at subway! come and enjoy two of your favorite six-inch subs -- just $2 each all december long. get the six-inch cold cut combo or the six-inch meatball marinara, built fresh from the bread up just the way you say for just $2. nobody says thank you like this! this december only at subway, where value is served up fresh all day. subway. eat fresh. >> schieffer: well that's all the time we have for today. but we'll be back next week and as we go we want to leave you with more of maya angelou's tribute to nelson mandela. no sun outlasts its sunset but will rise again and bring the dawn yes, mandela's day is done yet we, his inheritors will open the gates wider for reconciliation and we will respond generou
to do that. in cases he's chosen not to enforce laws like immigration law. is that, is he right? is this a president crossing the constitutional line. >> has a duty to execute the law. in instances with the affordable care act. removal of the cap on out of pocket expenditures he has changed law and doesn't have authority to do. that the president said he can't wait on congress. under our system of government he has to. he has been inconsistent with article two. >> mr. attorney general, thank you for updating us appreciate it. >> thank you. >> when we come back, incredible choices for tonight's video of the day. your choice, your selection is next as we continue tonight on "hannity". we are gao celebrate the union of tim and laura. it's amazing how appreciative people are when you tell them they could save a lot of money on their car insurance by switching to geico...they may even make you their best man. may i have the rings please? ah, helzberg diamonds. nice choice, mate. ...and now in the presence of these guests we join this loving couple. oh dear... geico. 15 minutes could
optimism on immigration reform that house republicans have to go back to constituents and say, here's what i was able to achieve in the house of representatives. that's going to be the thing that's going to be pressing and some folks might be wanting for come next year. >> just going back again to the interview with chris and the president. he also asks, chris matthews asks president obama about 2016. we don't have to play it but he played the middle game, complimenting them both heavily. >> it was a very diplomatic response. president obama holds both in high he steam. the political community doesn't expect both of them to run. it's going to be one or the other and right now looks like hillary clinton. >> mark, have a great weekend. thanks for joining us. if you missed chris's interview, it does reair today at 4:00 eastern on msnbc. we'll be right back. [ paper rustles, outdoor sounds ] ♪ [ male announcer ] laura's heart attack didn't come with a warning. today her doctor has her on a bayer aspirin regimen to help reduce the risk of another one. if you've had a heart attack, be sure to
're going to need strong application of anti-discrimination laws. we're going to need immigration reform that grows the economy and takes people out of the shadows. we're going to need target initiatives to close those gaps. [ applause ] but here's an opportunity point. the decades-long shifts in the economy have hurt all groups. poor and middle class, inner city and rural folks, men and women, and americans of all races. and americans of all races. and as a consequence, some of the social patterns that contribute to declining mobility that were once attributed to the urban poor -- you know, that's a particular problem for the inner city. single-parent households or drug abuse. it turns out now we're seeing that pop up everywhere. a new study shows that disparities in education, mental health, obesity, absent fathers, isolation from church, isolation from community groups, these gaps are now as much about growing up rich or poor as they are anything else. the gap in test scores between poor kids and wealthy kids is now nearly twice what it is between white kids and black kids. kids with
in at least 15 with tips. 25-year-old andy kim who immigrated from south korea went through the program and is now a full-time stylist. >> first time i could have taken this very well, but a lot of people helped. >> reporter: he's making more than $30,000 a year but he knows there's great opportunity for growth in a high end salon like this. owner diane fisher says all it takes are the skills required along with hard work and a very nice salary could follow. >> there's been some that make 200,000 a year. >> reporter: styling hair? >> yes. >> reporter: what do you think about that? >> i think it's wonderful. it makes me feel really good. i love it! >> that was peggy fox reporting. local career counselor colleen smith says waiters at nice restaurants, temp workers and seasonal workers can make more than $15 an hour. >>> you've got problems and our wusa9 call for action team is getting results. we are solving consumer disputes across our area. a dishwasher was ordered online with installation from a big box retailer. when the workers came out to install it, they could see it was damaged
not to enforce laws like immigration law. is that, is he right? is this a president crossing the constitutional line. >> has a duty to execute the law. in instances with the affordable care act. removal of the cap on out of pocket expenditures he has changed law and doesn't have authority to do. that the president said he can't wait on congress. under our system of government he has to. he has been inconsistent with article two. >> mr. attorney general, thank you for updating us appreciate it. >> thank you. >> when we come back, incredible choices for tonight's video of the day. your choice, your selection is next as we continue tonight on "hannity". if you've got copd like me, hey breathing's hard. know the feeling? copd includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. spiriva is a once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that helps open my obstructed airways for a full 24 hours. spiriva helps me breathe easier. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinat
, this will be his legacy issue. and if you look at the chances of getting immigration reform, of getting some kind of comprehensive jobs bill, of getting some kind of infrastructure, of getting tax reform which is what businesses say they'll need, he may have to use the next three years to make it work, and this may be what he's left with as his big legacy issue. >> but you write it's not just about the website. there are a lot of challenges ahead about will this thing float? >> the website is not fixed, either, particularly on the backhand. you have to deliver the information to the insurer and you're not getting accurate information to them. they don't know who is signing up. that's the big problem, young people not signing up right now in the numbers they have to to make this work long term, so you'll see problems with people not just losing their insurance policies but beginning to see what these narrow networks in these new policies. i can't keep my doctor, and by the way, maybe the price is not going up in 2014 by policy but by 2015, and that politics is going to roll out and hurt the democr
of two immigrants who come from india. decades earlier. we lifed in a house in bedford, massachusetts a middle class family. when i was five, my parents got divorced and my dad left. my mother was on her own having never held a job before. she faced going back to india, or going on welfare to support her two young children. in india, we would have been marked stigmatized. it was unheard of to get divorced back then. she knew our life opportunities would be limited. she made that tough choice. she stayed. we stayed. we were on welfare. we were on food stamps. we received housing vouchers to help pay for rent. but because of a series of events we were able to remain in bedford and i was able to go to the public schools. my mom eventually got at the job at the travel agent, and by the time i was 11, i'm proud to say that she bought her own house in bedford, massachusetts. my mom is an amazing woman who sacrificed a great deal for her children. but i know i'm here also because a lot of people were -- expand opportunity. it's hard a little bit to share my story. but i know we live in cynic
. a suburb of boston, the child of two immigrants from india. inlived in a house bedford, massachusetts, a middle-class town. when i was five, my parents got divorced and my dad left. my mother was on her own and never held a job before. she faced going back to india are going on welfare to support her two children. , we would've been stigmatized. it was unheard of to get divorced back then. she knew our life opportunities to be limited. she made that tough choice. she states. we stayed. we were on welfare. on food stamps. we received housing vouchers to pay for rent. but because of a series of fortuitous events, we were able to remain in bedford thomas and i was able to go to school. a job as atually got travel agent. by the time i was 11, i am proud to say that she bought her own house in bedford, massachusetts. my mom is an amazing woman who sacrificed a great deal for her children. i know i'm here also because a lot of people worked hard to expand opportunity. it's hard to share my story, but i know that we live in cynical times. it is easy to dismiss the fights in washington is par
to need immigration reform that grows the economy and takes people out of the shadows. we're going to need targeted initiatives to close those gaps. [applause] but here's an important point. the decades-long shifts in the economy have hurt all groups -- poor and middle class, inner city and rural folks, men and women, and americans of all races. and as a consequence, some of the social patterns that contribute to declining mobility that were once attributed to the urban poor -- that's a particular problem for the inner city -- single-parent households or drug abuse -- it turns out now we're seeing that pop up everywhere. a new study shows that disparities in education, mental health, obesity, absent fathers, isolation from church, isolation from community groups -- these gaps are now as much about growing up rich or poor as they are about anything else. the gap in test scores between poor kids and wealthy kids is now nearly twice what it is between white kids and black kids. kids with working-class parents are 10 times likelier than kids with middle- or upper-class parents to go through a
it will be -- there will be viciousness. >> i know. any bill passed. >> any bill passed. >> immigration, remember they were going to talk about immigrati immigration? >> such an important bill and a bill business would love to see passed. >> there can be so much anger down there. >> infrastructure spending. so many things we need to deal with, gridlock is not necessarily a good thing. >> true. and remember, i'm just saying gridlock, the conclusion is it is playing a role. same time, i don't know why anyone doesn't think it's the worst of -- the worst of the fights. we are so close to 2014. >> big board, by the way, brazilian metals and mining company with the investor day at the nyse and nasdaq, online jewelry retailer blue nile with cyber monday. talking to the company ceo later in the show. >> my trust owns this. a disappointment. this is a company that has been doing everything it can to try to cut back expenses. very small capital expenditure budget this year. it's in brazil and brazil has been a horrendous market. brazil is probably the most challenged of the bricks. and that's saying something because russia is in
,000 in the united states. immigration officials are reviewing the plan. now it's time for another episode of steve talks to the judge. >> thank you very much, brian. you have the right to remain silent is taking on a whole new meaning in the state of texas. a controversial new policy requires dallas police officers involved in shootings to wait 72 hours before giving a statement. what will that lead to? could it lead to a coverup? let's talk to fox news judicial senior analyst judge andrew napolitano. explain the back story. why is dallas doing this? >> the back story is a dallas police officer in the course of his duties shot and killed someone and in the person of filling out the report said the person he shot and killed lunged at him with a knife. then it turns out there were videotapes and there was no lunging and no knife. now the cop is being investigated for excessive use of force. could be a murder charge, could be nothing. what happens? the police unions in dallas pressured the chief to say we shouldn't have to give our version of the killings until we talk to everyone else involved, unti
minorities, immigrants, people that are special ed, special needs, and yet and still they're among top performers in the world. we have to understand that the adults created this system. this is not about kids that get the trophies, this is about adults that are uncomfortable going home with a child that doesn't have a trophy, this is about the adult that doesn't want to sit home and help his or her child do a homework assignment that might take up too much of their night. we have to own that we the adults have to put our children first and create situations in which we push not just the children but the educators that sur ound them. too many of us are comfortable with mediocrity. as michelle said, the rest of the world is moving forward. we haven't dropped, we're just losing in a race because we're not moving forward. >> frank talk from steve perry and michelle reed on this important issue. >>> we have much more ahead in the cnn newsroom and it all starts right now.
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)